iG lose 3-43 to LGD.cn in their G-1 Season 5 LAN finals debut; zhou’s thoughts on the defeat

In iG’s debut match against LGD.cn at the LAN finals for G-1 Season 5, iG unexpectedly lost by an enormous score disparity of 3-43. Here is what iG’s carry player zhou had to say…

http://t.qq.com/p/t/306103032964039

“Recently iG has been in poor form, and I must bear a large part of the responsibility. Thank you to all the fans who continue supporting us through our poor form, we will not fall like this. Even if we have to fight back from the bottom, we will be back one step at a time!”

SGamer interview with LongDD: I will grow old, but I will not leave

Oops, had this one backlogged. This is from May 15, a few days ago.

Original: http://dota2.sgamer.com/news/201305/150418_4.html

SGamer: Thank you to LongDD for doing this interview with SGamer.com. Earlier in the afternoon, you had told me that you were at the airport; where are you now?
LongDD: I’ve now arrived at the LGD team house.

SGamer: When you first left LGD a few days back, was there any anger?
LongDD: There wasn’t much anger, but there was a reluctatnce — I didn’t want to leave the pro scene, I didn’t want to give up on Seattle.

SGamer: Was it that once you left the team, LGD would have to play in the TI3 qualifiers? Additionally, something many people are curious about — when LGD first announced you as an official member, was there any contract signed?
LongDD: Indeed, because of my leaving the team, they would have to play in the qualifiers. My return this time is to accompany them along the way, to contribute that which I am able to. Everything was very rushed before so there was never any contract.

SGamer: LGD had mentioned in their earlier announcement that they had made efforts to keep you around by offering you other positions with the team, but you had declined. Why did you decline at first, and then return?
LongDD: Because I’d been playing professionally five years now, and had grown tired of floating around. After being out and about so many years, I wanted to go home. My role this time as a coach will still be a short one, just for a few days.

SGamer: Who contacted you to invite you back as coach? Does this all mean that you will still be leaving LGD after TI3?
LongDD: Xiao8 contacted me, and I agreed. There wasn’t much of a reason behind it, and if I had to say, it would be the fact that we’re all friends. After helping them make preparations for the TI3 qualifiers I’ll be leaving, so about 6 or 7 days…

SGamer: Why not choose to stick around with LGD, at least until after TI3?
LongDD: I will not stay, because I feel weary in the heart.

SGamer: Every in LGD is a veteran of the scene, so what will you mainly be responsible for?
LongDD: I’ve just arrived back so I’m still not sure exactly what. I think it’ll be things like summarizing results and strategies, making suggestions for improvements on things I see in 3v3 scrims, bans and picks, etc.

SGamer: How do you rate LGD’s current form? In terms of individual players do you think LGD can go toe-to-toe with iG?
LongDD: I’ve always felt that LGD has exceptional players in their team. Their loss in the DSL to VG, I feel, is only down to a lack of preparation.

SGamer: What do you think is the most important element of a typical competitive game now? Bans/pick stage?
LongDD: Nowadays in professional matches, the bans/picks determines something like 60-70% of the outcome. The rest of it is down to lane setups and how each lane fares, as well as performance and team execution. The reason I say this is because player skill is very similar between top teams now.

SGamer: Compared to the old mode of three bans in the first ban phase, what does the change to two bans bring?
LongDD: It means that strategies are more varied. Bans/picks become more difficult to get right, and thus require more out of each team in order to achieve success. It requires teams to know how to play more different styles. So competitive games nowadays possess a higher degree of tactical thought.

SGamer: What do you feel LGD’s greatest weakness right now?
LongDD: Mainly it is that they lack a wider array of styles. They must understand this, and practice some more combinations, and work on their mentality.

SGamer: Mentality? Are you saying their mentality right now isn’t in a good place?
LongDD: I personally feel that they need to try more different things; they can’t only always run the same exact things. The new styles coming from many different teams are things that cannot simply be ignored.

SGamer: After leaving LGD, you began making vods and streams. Has this been enjoyable for you, or have you still been thinking about……
LongDD: Playing pro? The professional lifestyle is a brutally competitive one. Without the chance of a good team, I don’t want to strive for it any longer. Streaming is quite fun, I had been spending 16, 17 hours a day doing it — putting my life into it, haha.

SGamer: Will you continue streaming after helping LGD with the TI3 qualifiers?
LongDD: Yes.

SGamer: Under your tutelage, how do you think LGD will do at G-1?
LongDD: I think they should be champions.

SGamer: What is training like for LGD right now? Are they mainly scrimming with the Int squad or with other teams?
LongDD: Yeah, the typical day is scrimming with various teams. During my time here I will help arrange some laning and bans/picks practices.

SGamer: Which teams do you scrim more with?LongDD: All about the same, we contact all of them.

SGamer: Do you feel that LGD is able to challenge iG’s position at the top?
LongDD: I feel that there is a possibility, and the possibility is a big one.

SGamer: Lastly, why don’t you bring this interview to an end?
LongDD: Thank you to those friends who have supported me all along. I will eventually grow old, but I will not leave.

G-1 All-Star match voting on-going: Chinese All-Stars vs International All-Stars

As of the beginning of this week, G-1 has had a voting page active for fans to select all-star rosters for a Chinese versus Rest of World match to take place during day 1 of the G-1 Finals, May 24. The voting is open to all, and does not require an account. As of this post, it looks like the Chinese All-Star team will be BurNIng + iG, while the International All-Stars have three Alliance members accompanied by Korok and Net. While some of the vote leads are significant, nothing is quite set in stone yet, and some positions still remain close.

While voting is not over yet, we are past the halfway mark — so be sure to get your votes in now! All-Star match voting will conclude on May 20, and the match itself will take place on May 24.

http://g1.17173.com/voting/

Dota 2 Super League Preview

A quick preview of the groups and teams in the upcoming Dota 2 Super League…

The Dota 2 Super League (DSL) begins on May 10 in Shanghai, with 10 powerhouse teams congregating for a showdown via group stages, playoffs, elimination, and finals, for the chance at over 1 million RMB in prize money.

Group A sees a relatively larger gap in ability. Apart from it being expected that iG will top the group, all the other spots are up for grabs amongst the other teams.

1. iG: TI2 champions, widely recognized as the best team in the world currently, they’ve successfully dominated just about every major event in 2012 and 2013. Every position in the team is played at a world-class level. For iG, the only question is whether anyone else has the power in them to take them down, and challenge them for first in the group.
Star players: all of iG

2. LGD.cn: Third place at TI2, managed to defeat iG in G-1. However, they’ve undergone a series of changes lately, with LongDD leaving not long after joining, which highlights an element of instability within LGD.cn. Can LGD.cn show us a new face along with their recent changes?
Star players: xiao8, Sylar

3. Vici Gaming: A new team not long formed, yet the presence in their team of one of the three big carries of yesteryear, ZSMJ, brings a major talking point for viewers and competitors alike. Can VG achieve a top 3 finish in this group with such time-honored talent? And as a former LGD player, ZSMJ, who had once brought so much glory to his old team, will be looking to prove himself against them now. By his side, newcomer Cty is another point of interest to look forward to.
Star players: ZSMJ, Cty

4. TongFu: A team that seems to match the level of their opponents, strong when facing strong, weak when facing weak, they possess Hao and Mu, two top tier Chinese players, yet have been in terrible form recently. After switching out two players, can they re-discover their touch?
Star players: Hao, Mu

5. ForLove: One of the best of the second tier Chinese teams, ForLove has some history behind them, yet have always stuttered a bit when it came to results. They have fairly plentiful experience, yet haven’t found their own rhythm in making a breakthrough somewhere. Similar to TongFu, they’re appearing here after making rostre changes, and whether the changes will make the difference for them remains to be seen.
Star players: you, hanci

Group B sees a much closer spread in terms of team ability. Just who advances and who falls might come unpredictably. New teams in here may have new styles of play, DK itches to redeem themselves, and interest will be high in seeing whether LGD.int and Orange can break through in the Chinese scene.

1. DK: Predicting DK as first place here, isn’t necessarily because they are clear favorites in terms of ability in the group, but more because their past performances demand this kind of high expectation for them. They have the world’s greatest carry player, the Anti-Mage himself, BurNIng. They have trash talk king xB/rOtk, and they have Super, 357, and MMY, players who have won countless championships before. DK’s results in the past year have been poor, yet anyone who overlooks them does so at their own peril, because their experience and determination here will not be lacking — as long as they execute well, winning everything is not a dream
Star players: BurNIng, xB/rOtk

2. LGD.int: Runners up in the G-League 2012 Season 2, a team formed of players from five different countries. They train together with LGD.cn in Hangzhou, combining the light grace of European Dota with the steadiness of Chinese Dota, and this gives them more than enough to compete in group b. They’re the ‘foreigners’ Chinese team’.
Star players: God, Misery

3. Orange: The only true foreign team present here, representing the top of SEA Dota. Their star player and the heart of the team, Mushi, has been known for a long time with his stylish play and flashy antics. In the recent G-1 qualifiers, he led Orange to next offline stage, proving that they can stand amongst the best that China has to offer. As the sole truly non-Chinese team, can they make it all the way?
Star player: Mushi

4. RisingStars: Another new team, formed recently by former members of DT.Club and Noah’s Ark. They’ve got undeniable personal and team skill, but are lacking in match experience and adaptability. Their style tends to be over-aggressive, so a matchup with them in it is guaranteed to be exciting to watch. They also often bring out innovative tactics, and are a very imaginative team.
Star players: Super, Mofi

5. RattleSnake: A new team of old players, all of their members have rich experience. Their captain, Luo, is recognized as a master of strategy, and often brings unexpected picks and tactics. This team has been recognized as having great dark horse potential in the group.
Star players: Luo, LaNm

Source: http://dota2.17173.com/news/05062013/162347528_2.shtml

G-1 Interviews Roundup: Ohaiyo, YYF, Sylar, 357, iceiceice, ddc, and more!

Lots of good interviews with all sorts of players and managers, from G-1! Check ’em all out below~

LGD.ddc: In order to improve, we must change

DDC flaunts his humor and talks about recent LGD changes, funny interview…

Zenith.iceiceice: 50-50 against iG

Now, obviously Zenith lost against iG, but not without a fight. This interview, in all other ways, is one of epic proportions and laughs…

Orange.Ohaiyo: Every team wants the same thing

Ohaiyo shares his and the team’s goals, the difference between his style and Mushi’s in solo mid…

DK.357/QQQ: We’re training hard

357/QQQ/MMY talks about DK’s recent ups and downs, their training, and what they need to improve on…

LGD.Nic take two: We are the defending champs!

LGD’s manager, in this second interview with G-1, discusses LGD.cn’s recent role changes, LGD.int’s chances, Pajkatt…

iG.YYF: Confidence, teamwork, are our strengths

YYF talks about their recent form, the match against Zenith, and the source of iG’s success…

LGD.Sylar: I feel great

Sylar tells us about his feelings (after winning), and discusses LGD.cn’s recent performances…

G-1 Interviews Roundup: xiao8, Mushi, Faith, RSnake and LGD managers, and more!

Lots of interviews for G-1… check ’em all out at the G-1 portal. Previews and direct links below!

LGD.xiao8 talks about Group A

G-1 Phase 3 is set to begin on March 27, with the LGD derby between their int and cn squads leading off. In anticipation, we interviewed LGD.cn’s Director 8, xiao8, to learn more about how they’ve been doing lately!

Orange.Mushi: We hope to see you all in China!

The groups for Phase 3 of G-1 have begun. Malaysian powerhouse Orange has been grouped with three strong Chinese teams, and it remains to be seen whether Mushi can lead his team out of the surround. Let us see here what Mushi has to share with us all.

iG.Faith: Offline finals will be spectacular!

Powerhouse iG finally makes their appearance at Season 5 of the G-1 Champions League. We got an interview with iG support player Faith, who shared with us some of iG’s training and talked about his thoughts on this season’s G-1. Take a look below!

LGD.Pajkatt: G-1 is a lot of fun

Pajkatt talks about life in China, his role as carry, and more!

RSnake.JET: RattleSnake manager speaks

The manager sheds some light on this new team, composed of old veteran players.

LGD.Nic: LGD manager gives a glimpse into the world of LGD

In this interview with LGD’s Dota manager Nic (Chinese ID: Chaorenwa), he gives us an overview of the Int squad players, what they do in their spare time, how he got where he is today, and more. Read on below to take a step into the world of LGD!

 

iG.ChuaN and iG CEO Efeng question and answer session

iG held an event on t.qq (similar to Twitter) where anyone could ask questions and they would answer. Good questions, good answers. Check it out.

Questions to ChuaN and his answers

Q: How tall are you and YYF?
ChuaN: I am 190cm (roughly 6 ft 2 in), I dunno about YYF

Q: Will your girlfriend think you’re too fat?ChuaN: I am working hard to lose weight!

Q: Can you reveal how speaking rights are divided within the team?
ChuaN: We discuss things together, there isn’t really anything like that

Q: ChuaN-god, it’s been a while since you’ve come to China. After your pro gaming career ends, what are your plans? Will you stay in China? Or go back home?
ChuaN: Right now all I’m thinking about is how to play well, and get good results.

Q: Will there be more interactive events between players and fans?
ChuaN: We often do these on our official YY channel 90007, and we’ll be frequently streaming first person gameplay there as well, we welcome everyone to come visit! (Dotaland guide on how to watch YY streams here)

Q: How did you first step onto the path of becoming a pro player? In many people’s view, esports is the same as casual play… Can you tell us what your training is like? Is it at all similar to what some people think?
ChuaN: I stepped onto this path by playing and fighting for my dreams! Esports has become my professional career, so it isn’t simply play! Every day we undergo specific, targeted, and planned training!

Q: ChuaN-god! I am here in the name of my roommate, who wishes to profess his love to you!
ChuaN: Thank you, I love you guys too!

Q: You went from being a solo mid player to successfully transforming into a 4 position support, very different roles both mentally and attitude-wise. How did you adapt?ChuaN: Thinking back on that moment standing on stage as champions, all the sacrifice is worth it! The team and togetherness above all else!

Q: Are you optimistic about Dota 2 in China?
ChuaN: I am very much optimistic about Dota 2 in China!

Q: How long is your daily training, does the club arrange other activities for relaxation?
ChuaN: The club arranges physical exercise; I am really good at basketball! ;P

Q: How much longer do you plan on playing Dota, ChuaN-god?
ChuaN: I will play until I cannot play anymore!

Q: Which competitions will iG.Dota take part in in the coming year?
ChuaN: All big competitions we will participate in! And we’ll do our best to achieve good results, we hope that everyone supports us!

Q: iG add oil
ChuaN: Thank you for the support!

Q: iG is my spiritual belonging, I believe in iG… How does an esports club have this much magic?
ChuaN: It is the result of a collective effort and nurturing! 🙂

Questions to iG CEO Efeng and his answers

Q: Will there be iG-branded merchandise? Stuff like gaming peripherals, perhaps?
Efeng: Yes! This year, even!

Q: Out of iG’s players, who do you think will get married first?
Efeng: My guess is either YYF or Zhou.

Q: Can I get a blessing from you in my quest for the goddess in my life?
Efeng: Sure, as long as your goddess isn’t my wife, I officially bless your quest.

Q: What do esports players do after they retire?
Efeng: The cream of the crop can continue on as leaders, coaches, or managers after they retire. Others can transition into club support staff, media people, or work at gaming companies, or become a commentator. Lots of possibilities 🙂

Q: Efeng, what are your views on those players who are still very young, and also need to continue their studies?
Efeng: I feel that these things aren’t necessarily in conflict with one another. Games can be their hobby from youth, it’s the same basic principle as those kids that take up things like art, sports, etc. And if they display true talent in some way, then they can consider a career in it. 🙂

Q: Hello sir, can you say whether you’re satisfied with the atmosphere of our esports scene? Compared to foreign esports, what are some weaknesses of Chinese esports?
Efeng: Still lacking in mainstream recognition and understanding.

Q: When will the iG website get an overhaul? It’s lacking compared to many foreign clubs’ sites. Looking forward to official iG forums, so we iG fans have somewhere to go. What do you think?
Efeng: It’s all in the works! There’ll be an all-new look soon!

Q: I would like to ask, what is average pay and compensation like in the industry, what are the benefits?
Efeng: Staff are comparable to typical gaming companies. For players, it depends on the club and the players’ ability. The better the results, the more popular the player, the more they get paid… similar to professional sports.

Q: As a university student, how can I best contribute to esports?
Efeng: Study hard, graduate, then join the esports industry!

Q: Any considerations for creating sub-teams, for example regional or provincial feeder teams?
Efeng: Yes, in the future we will have all sorts of developmental squads.

Q: As management of the club, what are the most important things for the club’s success? Where does most of your funding come from? Thank you.
Efeng: I think that the most important things are stability and the ability to execute well. Funding mostly comes from sponsors, sales, events, and promotional activities.

Q: Have you thought about creating an international squad?
Efeng: If Chinese players are the best in something, then what’s the point in creating an international team?

Q: What are your thoughts on flexibility of roles and the ability to transition between roles in esports?
Efeng: I feel that the limits are much fewer, and it is much easier to transition between roles in the esports industry, as long as one is willing and able to work hard. Those who can be successful players can also be successful esports staff. 🙂

Q: How do you compare Chinese esports skill level with foreign?
Efeng: Chinese esports is very strong!

Q: For esports to sucessfully become an Olympic event, what do you think is the biggest bottlenet? What are primary cash flows for various parts of the club? Thank you.
Efeng: I think the biggest bottleneck is popular support and recognition… As for funding for, players have their salary, bonuses, sponsorship and events, the club has sponsors and sales, and staff have their salaries.

 

 

Heads up: iG.YYF to be on Live on Three tonight

http://www.reddit.com/r/DotA2/comments/1a83ai/live_interview_with_igyyf_tonight_on_live_on/

In case you missed it — according to this reddit thread, fan favorite iG.YYF will be on Lo3 with Slasher, etc, for an interview. The interview responses will be translated live by Dota Chinese localization team lead HippoVic. Check the reddit thread for all details, stream links, etc!

 

iG takes G-League Season 2 Finals over LGD.int by a score of 3-1

iG takes G-League Season 2 Finals over LGD.int by a score of 3-1! These G-League finals were spectacular, and through a day of esports, the Dota2 finals came as the final (and arguably focal) event of the night. With the team intros playing, iG and LGD.int began their showdown. Ultimately iG emerged victorious by a score of 3-1. Having taken the first two games with relative ease against LGD.int, they needed a long game four to seal it against a much improved LGD.int showing in the latter two games of the match.

According to Gamefy, the organizers of the tournament, the G-League Season 2 Finals had a live attendance at the Shanghai Mercedes-Benz Arena of nearly 10,000 people. Nice crowd.

Vods of the G-League Season 2 Grand Finals of 2013 are listed below.

BTS vods:

joinDota vods: 1234

Chinese vods: HERE